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Museum Club

AOS (Autism Outreach Service) works with school aged children who are statemented with an Autism Spectrum disorder who find accessing school a challenge, either through their own behaviour or through social phobias.

1st February 2010 - 30th April 2010

 

 
This involvement has 3 stages: (i) Stabilization- gaining trust through their interest, capitalising on their cultural, artistic, leisure talents. (ii) Education- implementing educational intervention to build self-esteem, confidence and interest (iii) Transition- moving the studebt back into more formalised education, better equipped to deal with the challenges that occurred previously.
The project targets KS3/4 students with ASD living within the NW Leics area so that they can access Snibston Discovery Park.

This involvement has 3 stages: (i) Stabilization- gaining trust through their interest, capitalising on their cultural, artistic, leisure talents. (ii) Education - implementing educational intervention to build self-esteem, confidence and interest (iii) Transition- moving the studebt back into more formalised education, better equipped to deal with the challenges that occurred previously.

The project targets KS3/4 students with ASD living within the NW Leics area so that they can access Snibston Discovery Park.

 

  • To test a method of programme delivery based on cultural and community based learning that fully engages young people’s decision making.

    To develop, in consultation with young people with Autism, a creative learning programme.

    To encourage the facilitation of peer interaction between individuals with/without an Autism Spectrum Disorder.

  • Consultation with all group members, parents, carers to plan the content of the sessions through open and inclusive discussions.

    Identifying experienced creative facilitators with understanding and empathy towards those on the ASD spectrum.

  • The project has just begun (25 January 2010).

    However the project has already delivered training, as a result of this funding, to Museum Learning and Inclusion staff- equipping them with the skills and knowledge to deal with visitors with Autism.

    Students have been encouraged to bring a friend, sibling, or parent to early sessions, and family engagement will be encouraged both during and after the 10 week programme.

    The project will be documented using video and still cameras to capture the progress of the group and to culminate in a final  display at Snibston  of what has been achieved.

  • The East Midlands Regional Autism Partners –which includes representatives from 9 Local Education Authorities are very interested in this project and await its outcomes. Potentially this could have significant impact nationally- information could be shared with other Local Authorities, and influence their approach to working collaboratively with their ‘internal’ services.

    Autism Outreach Service (AOS) are already considering the potential to extend this programme throughout the year.

    Dependant on funding, this could  include: Summer/Autumn camps, working with Countryside and Parks to ensure young people on the autistic spectrum, and their families don’t miss out.

ASD PATHFINDER is a pilot project- using art, science, history to engage young people with Autism, in a range of  creative activities, within a museum setting.

As such, it is of local, regional and national significance. The East Midlands Regional Autism Partners have been ‘dumbfounded and amazed’ by the creativity and potential of this project and awaiting its outcomes.

The project was originated in partnership between the Autism Outreach Service and Leicestershire Museums, and will also include volunteer services and support from students at Loughborough University and Stephensons College.

Currently, the project will engage 10-12 students, across the Autistic spectrum, aged 13+ living in the NW Leicestershire area.